The Case for Right-to-Work in New Hampshire: Examining the Evidence in Oklahoma

The New Hampshire Center for Economic Policy (NHCEP) has issued a new report that demonstrates the measurable effect adopting Right-to-Work (RTW) laws has on a state’s economy by examining the most recent state to free employees and employers from mandated union arrangements.

Oklahoma has experienced growth in the number of households, population and manufacturing GDP since the implementation of RTW in 2003.  Most of the in-migration of people and jobs has come at the expense of non-RTW states – proving that no matter what is happening in the national economy, there are positive steps available for individual states to strengthen their own economies and job growth.

NHCEP policy experts commented on their findings, in context of New Hampshire’s current opportunity to adopt Right-to-Work laws:

“During a time when people are concerned about America’s economy, it’s very exciting to be able to illustrate that there are things an individual state can do on its own behalf,” noted NHCEP president J. Scott Moody.  “Oklahoma is the most recent state to adopt Right-to-Work, and the Sooners are booming.”

Moody continued:“If New Hampshire would move in the same direction, and adopt Right-to-Work, I predict the results would be even more positive because we already have the advantages of the largest private sector in the country, as well as no sales or income taxes. Plus, the closest competing Right-to-Work state is Virginia – so why would any company in the Northeast move anywhere but New Hampshire?”

“The best part about choosing Right-to-Work now is that it’s a proven policy that will not cost the state treasury any short-term lost revenues,” adds Chief Economist Wendy Warcholik.”In fact, this policy will strengthen the state’s finances by helping New Hampshire companies become more competitive and add workers. It will also make New Hampshire even more attractive for new business start-ups and for established companies to relocate here.”

“Another way of looking at New Hampshire’s current situation regarding Right-to-Work is to see the Tenth Amendment in action,” concluded Mr. Moody.  “Individual states are free to experiment with policies within their own borders, with the luxury of seeing what works in other states and what doesn’t work.  We hope that New Hampshire’s leaders take this opportunity to review the positive results from Oklahoma’s decision on Right-to-Work and make it happen here too.”

To read the NHCEP report detailing Oklahoma’s experiences with Right-to-Work, please click this link: http://nheconomics.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/NHCEP-Liberty-in-Economics-Volume-1-Issue-4-Right-to-Work-110311.pdf

Mr. J. Scott Moody and Dr. Wendy Warcholik are available for press interviews, on-air appearances and in-person presentations of this research.  If you have any questions or would like to arrange a meeting, please contact Scott Moody via e-mail at scottmoody@nheconomics.org or by calling 603-277-0255.

NHCEP Recommends Right-to-Work

The New Hampshire Center for Economic Policy (NHCEP) recently issued two reports about the crisis of New Hampshire’s Unfunded Liability, one detailing the deep problem, and a follow-up which recommended solutions.  One of the key recommendations was for New Hampshire to become a Right To Work state.

NHCEP policy experts commented on the current Right To Work legislation:

“It’s very exciting to see New Hampshire on the brink of becoming the first Right To Work state in New England,” noted NHCEP president J. Scott Moody. “Right now, the closest Right To Work state is Virginia.  Given that New Hampshire already has the largest private sector in the country, as well as no sales or income tax, why would any company go anywhere else but New Hampshire?”

“The best part about choosing Right to Work is that it’s a proven policy that any state can do for themselves, and New Hampshire is leading the way in the Northeast,” adds Chief Economist Wendy Warcholik. “This policy will help New Hampshire companies stay competitive and add workers; it makes the state even more attractive for new business to start here and for established companies to move here.  Adopting Right To Work is great news that shows solid long-term thinking by our legislators.”

To read the NHCEP report detailing the state’s growing unfunded liability for retiree pensions and benefits, please click this link:   http://nheconomics.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/NHCEP-Liberty-in-Economics-Volume-1-Issue-1-New-Hampshire-Pension-Crisis-021711.pdf

To read the follow-up recommendations to solve this fiscal problem, including Right To Work, please click this link:    http://nheconomics.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/NHCEP-Liberty-in-Economics-Volume-1-Issue-2-New-Hampshire-Pension-Solutions-031511.pdf

Mr. J. Scott Moody and Dr. Wendy Warcholik are available for press interviews, on-air appearances and in-person presentations of this research.  If you have any questions or would like to arrange a meeting, please contact Martin Sheehan, the Director of Communications via e-mail at martinsheehan@nheconomics.org or by calling 207-650-7335.

The Great Tax Divide: New Hampshire’s Retail Oasis vs. Maine’s Retail Desert

The New Hampshire Center for Economic Policy (NHCEP) has some good economic news about important state policies that have worked extremely well for the people of New Hampshire.

“Every state in America is competing with 49 other states for resources, businesses and the jobs they create,” notes NHCEP president J. Scott Moody.  “This new research details some of the policy decisions that make New Hampshire one of the best places in America to run a business.  Our retail and service sectors have the added advantage of being surrounded by states known for high taxes, which emphasize New Hampshire’s sound policies.  For the purposes of this report, we make a state-to-state comparison with Maine, which has a similar population working with dissimilar tax policies.”

“Beyond the results of this study, it is energizing and exciting to be an economist in 2011 with some good news!” adds Chief Economist Wendy Warcholik.  “It’s also very timely too, as the New Hampshire Legislature is considering a reduction to the Cigarette Tax of a dime per pack.  We agree that this tax roll-back will actually increase state revenues and, more importantly, offer stronger incentives for Cross-Border Shoppers to choose New Hampshire.”

“Maine shoppers travel to New Hampshire businesses to such a high degree, that retail locations are few and far between on their side of the border,” Mr. Moody continued.  “Whether it’s for cigarettes or chainsaws or big screen TV sets, New Hampshire businesses are winning the competition for shoppers’ dollars – and also experiencing a less severe recession thanks to the pro-growth state policies that have been in place for decades.”

Mr. Moody concluded: “This new research gives us the rare chance of pointing out some good economic news for New Hampshire in the middle of a recession.  The take-away from this research is that it proves the wisdom of New Hampshire’s low-tax, pro-business policies which jump-start businesses in good times; and reduce the negative economic impact during bad times.”

Read this new report, with Good Economic News for New Hampshire here:  http://nheconomics.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/NHCEP-Liberty-in-Economics-Volume-1-Issue-3-The-Great-Tax-Divide-041311.pdf

Mr. J. Scott Moody and Dr. Wendy Warcholik are available for press interviews, on-air appearances and in-person presentations of this research.  If you have any questions or would like to arrange a meeting, please contact Martin Sheehan, the Director of Communications via e-mail at martinsheehan@nheconomics.org or by calling 207-650-7335.